The Perfect Clothes Pin

a great clothes pin is a work of art.

a great clothes pin is a work of art.

Yes, there is such a thing.

I spent this week in one of my favourite thrifting places – Victoria, BC. There are tons of thrift shops in this city and many of them in the downtown core, within walking distance of the hotel that we always stay in when my sweetheart has to attend conferences. (I tag along to do important things like snuggle at night time, provide stimulating conversation at dinner and thrift shop. Not necessarily in that order. But I digress.)

clothes-pin-packOne of my happiest finds this time around was a bag of near perfect clothes pins. I was ELATED. If you are a clothesline user, you’ll know that all clothes pins are NOT created equal. Many are too small or the metal spring is wimpy and won’t hold up a pair of jeans. Some are made of rough wood which then snags your clothes when you remove them. And aside from all these things, they are nearly impossible to find.

in the UK, these are called clothes pegs

in the UK, these are called clothes pegs

Many of the clothes pins I have used for years were thrifted in the first place and have served me well but they’re starting to break or they’ve gotten lost in the garden when dropped from the deck while taking clothes off the line. I tried buying some new ones at Bed, Bath & Beyond but they were of the wimpy spring variety. I don’t want to buy plastic ones because, you know, plastic.

So when I found this sack-full for $1.50, I nearly jumped for joy right there in the aisle. (In fact I might have… that would explain the look of alarm on the faces of my fellow shoppers.) I picked these up at my favourite shop: the WIN Reuse Store on Pandora.

the metal spring needs to be strong if it's going to hold up jeans, sheets or towels - especially if it gets windy

the metal spring needs to be strong if it’s going to hold up jeans, sheets or towels – especially if it gets windy

I also discovered that there are several WIN shops in Victoria. I visited the one on Wilson, which is quite small and has a very boutique kinda feel to it. I also visited the first WIN shop on Cook St., which is also small but has a wonderful community vibe going on with regular customers coming in and chatted with volunteers. I think if you live near these two shops and frequented them, you’d probably find deals quite regularly. But as a destination thrift shop, the one on Pandora has never failed to provide with me all kinds of great stuff and that’s largely due to its size: it simply is able to offer more because it’s bigger.

So, are you a clothesline user? If so, what’s your favourite part about using a clothesline?

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